Course Overview

The Higher Diploma in Economic Science is an intensive and challenging two-semester taught programme in core economic theory and methods. In addition, a variety of specialist options are provided. It is mainly intended for those aiming for entry to a Master’s degree programme but who have not yet studied economics in sufficient depth for direct entry. It is attractive to those with scientific and engineering backgrounds, as well as humanities, business and social sciences graduates.

Applications and Selections

Applications are made online via The Postgraduate Applications Centre (PAC). Relevant PAC application code(s) above.

Who Teaches this Course

Requirements and Assessment

Assessment is typically by way of a combination of end-of-semester written examinations and continuous assessment components, in particular, term papers and project work.

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

An honours primary degree either with some economics modules or modules of a quantitative/mathematical/statistical nature.

Additional Requirements

Duration

Two semesters

Next start date

September 2018

A Level Grades ()

Average intake

25

Closing Date

Please refer to the offer rounds/closing date webpage.

Next start date

September 2018

NFQ level

Mode of study

Taught

ECTS weighting

Award

CAO

PAC code

GYC12

Course Outline

Have you studied some economics, but wish to do more, and perhaps go on to a masters degree? Or, if you haven’t studied economics but have a degree, would you like to begin? The Higher Diploma in Economic Science may be the programme for you

You will take one of two streams, depending on the level of economics you have previously encountered. Both streams include courses in microeconomic and macroeconomic theory, as well as statistical/econometric or mathematical methods in economics. You will also have a choice from a range of elective modules, usually including the History of Economic Thought, the Economics of Money and Banking/Financial Economics, the Economics of Health, Environmental Economics, Irish Economic History, Public Economics, and Development Economics (the precise electives available may vary from year to year). In this way, you can build on your core knowledge and develop specialist interests, in many cases aligned with your intended area of focus within economics.

Students work on a supervised research paper in economics over two semesters (ending in May), providing a further opportunity to focus on areas of particular interest aligned with their career ambitions.

Did you Know?

 A combined fee arrangement applies to those who complete this programme and subsequently are admitted to one of the three masters in economics at NUI Galway (i.e., international finances, health economics, and natural resources economics and policy). In these cases, the higher diploma is treated as the first year of a two-year programme, with the second, (masters) year involving a lower fee (in 2018/19, this is expected to be €3,000 for EU students). Contact the programme director for details.

Modules for 2017-18

Curriculum information relates to the current academic year (in most cases).
Course and module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Glossary of Terms

Credits
You must earn a defined number of credits (aka ECTS) to complete each year of your course. You do this by taking all of its required modules as well as the correct number of optional modules to obtain that year's total number of credits.
Optional
A module you may choose to study.
Required
A module that you must study if you choose this course (or subject).
Semester
Most courses have 2 semesters (aka terms) per year.

Year 1 (60 Credits)

Required EC269: Intermediate Microeconomics


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This course is primarily focused on neo-classical choice theory, where the decision-making agents are consumers and firms. This approach assumes that all social outcomes are the result of rational self-regarding individual actions. The implication of this perspective for government policy is also addressed. We will also look at a competing paradigm, loosely defined as Critical Institutionalist/Evolutionary. Institutional theories assume that human motivation may be less narrowly egoistic (and materialistic), that preferences evolve, that social norms influence behaviour and that in the face of uncertainty, rationality can mean many types of conduct. The reason for introducing another paradigm is precisely because we question the notion that there is one correct way to interpret economic and social phenomena. This is important given that economics is a policy oriented discipline. It is also of normative consequence since government policies that facilitate or restrain markets, as well as policies regarding property rights determine individual and collective welfare. Evaluation in this normative sense requires students to address the issues of individual and societal welfare.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. understand the scope and limitations of, primarily, the neo-classical approach to explaining economic phenomena (since it is the dominant school of thought to which most time will be devoted) but also the alternative paradigm presented.
  2. facilitate students to think critically about economics and the popular presentation of economic facts and economic policies.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (60%)
  • Continuous Assessment (40%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Microeconmics and Behaviour" by Frank R.
    Publisher: McGraw Hill
  2. "Microeconomics: Neoclassical and Institutional Perspectives on Economic Behaviour." by Himmelweit, S, Simonetti, R and A. Trigg
    Publisher: Thomson Learning
The above information outlines module EC269: "Intermediate Microeconomics" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EC273: Mathematics for Economics


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

The purpose of this course is to provide students the necessary mathematical skills to pursue more advanced courses in economics. The course is devised to enhance the technical skills in the areas of Algebra and Calculus, which are used in almost all the subdisciplines of economics. The course aims provide both the analytical and computational skills that are required for the analysis of economic problems.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. to have both the analytical and computationalskills that are required for the analysis of economic problems
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Mathematics for Economics & Business" by Ian Jacques
    Publisher: Prentice Hall
The above information outlines module EC273: "Mathematics for Economics" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EC427: Ireland, Europe & the Global Economy


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This module is available to final Arts (including denominated degrees) students, Higher Diploma in Economic Science students, and international students. It provides a survey of contemporary economic policy issues, mainly macroeconomic in nature. Throughout, Ireland’s experience is placed in the context of the process of economic globalisation. Globalisation in turn is understood as an historical process, with many precedents for current events.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Contextualise Ireland’s economic experience within the framework of globalisation
  2. Integrate theoretical concepts in economic policy with their empirical counterparts
  3. Identify key policy challenges and constraints which arise from European economic integration
  4. Explore alternative policy prescriptions for contemporary macroeconomic problems in Ireland
  5. Relate policy alternatives to political economy concerns
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (70%)
  • Continuous Assessment (30%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module EC427: "Ireland, Europe & the Global Economy" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EC415: Research Paper I


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

The module EC415 Research Paper I comprises three elements: • a series of written assignments, consisting of a series of drafts and re-drafts of the student's proposal, extending and refining the student's core research question, culminating in the proposal itself, • Weekly classes, which will in part be used to discuss the student's assignments and related work, and otherwise to discuss a range of research tasks and skills, and • some individual meetings with course instructor, particularly in the early stages, to offer feedback and to guide the student's work: Meetings are scheduled during weeks 4 and 5 and later in weeks 7 and 8 also.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. to produce a detailed proposal of about 2,500 words, for a research paper in economics by the end of Semester I
  2. to produce the final output—the research paper itself, of about 6,000 words—for the module EC416 Research Paper II, by the end of Semester II.
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module EC415: "Research Paper I" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EC268: Intermediate Macroeconomics


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This is an intermediate level course, both in drawing on your previous exposure to macroeconomics, and acting as prelude to further study in third year. An overall theme is that macroeconomic theory is useful in helping us to understand real-world events, and in particular, to understand the role of macroeconomic policy. Several economic models will be studied, within a framework which analyses both long-run economic performance and short-run fluctuations. The models will be used to help explain various economic policy issues, both domestically (Ireland) and in an international (EU/eurozone) setting.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Recognise the linkages between the behaviour of key economic variables (output, inflation, unemployment) over the long-run
  2. Analyse the economic relationships between countries, and how exchange rates affect trade
  3. Analyse how incomes tend to grow over the long-run
  4. Use economic models to explain how and why economies experience short-run fluctuations away from long-run trends
  5. Show how policymakers can respond to short-run fluctuations in the economy
  6. Develop an understanding of different macro schools of thought
  7. Work (source, gather, interpret, use) with macro data
  8. Comprehend the macroeconomy (and macro policy) of Ireland and the Eurozone
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (60%)
  • Continuous Assessment (40%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Macroeconomics a European text" by Burda, M. and Wyplosz C
  2. "Macroeconomics: An Irish and European Perspective" by Leddin, Anthony and Walsh, Brendan
    Publisher: Gill and Macmillan
  3. "Principles of Economics" by Turley G., with M. Maloney and F. O’Toole
    Publisher: Gill and Macmillan
The above information outlines module EC268: "Intermediate Macroeconomics" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EC275: Statistics for Economics


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This course provides an introduction to the techniques used to collect, present, and analyse numerical data to make inferences and reach decisions in the face of uncertainty in economics and other social sciences. The course is divided into two sections: (1) Descriptive Statistics, and (2) Inferential Statistics.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. (1) Descriptive Statistics: Distinguish between qualitative variables and quantitative variables. Describe how a discrete variable is different from a continuous variable. Distinguish among the nominal, ordinal, interval, and ratio levels of measurement. Organize and present qualitative data in a frequency table, bar chart and pie chart. Organize and present quantitative data in a frequency distribution, histogram, frequency polygon, and cumulative frequency polygon. Calculate the mean, median, and mode. Explain the characteristics, uses, advantages, and disadvantages of each measure of location. Calculate the range, mean deviation, variance, and standard deviation. Understand the charact
  2. (2) Inferential Statistics: Describe the classical, empirical, and subjective approaches to probability. Explain the terms experiment, event, outcome, permutations, and combinations. Define the terms conditional probability and joint probability. Calculate probabilities using the rules of addition and rules of multiplication. Distinguish between discrete and continuous probability distributions. Calculate the mean, variance, and standard deviation of discrete and continuous probability distributions. Describe the characteristics of and compute probabilities using the binomial, poison, uniform and the normal probability distributions. Describe methods to select a sample. Explain the cen
Assessments
  • Continuous Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Basic Statistics for Business and Economics" by Lind/Marchal/Wathen
The above information outlines module EC275: "Statistics for Economics" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Required EC416: Research Paper II


Semester 2 | Credits: 10

The aim of this module is to address any immediate revisions necessary to the version of the proposal the students submitted in Semester 1, taking into account further thoughts (if any) since that time, and also more clearly signalling in some cases, on the front page, that this is a research paper proposal, rather than the paper itself—just a detail so that the adviser is clear that this is still a ‘work-in-progress’.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. to produce a research paper of c. 5,000 words in the body of the paper (i.e. excluding the bibliography, tables and any material in appendices)
Assessments
  • Department-based Assessment (100%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module EC416: "Research Paper II" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EC219: Comparative Economic Thought


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

The objective of this course is to introduce the student to a variety of economic perspectives which differ from the standard neoclassical approach.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Develop a critique of the neoclassical approach
  2. Identify different approaches to economic questions
  3. Explain the basic ideas of different schools of thought
  4. Understand how different schools of thought lead to different analyses of economic issues
  5. Critically asses the success of different schools of thought in describing reality and developing policy
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "The course text is a compilation of assigned readings." by The Lecturer
  2. "23 Things They Don’t Tell You about Capitalism" by Ha-Joon Chang
    Publisher: Thing 17
  3. "Reintroducing Macroeconomics" by Cohn
    Chapters: Chap. 1
  4. "Economics: A New Introduction" by Hugh Stretton
    Chapters: Chap. 2
  5. "Debunking Economics" by Steve Keen
    Chapters: Chap. 3
  6. "Contending Economic Theories" by Wolff and Resnick
  7. "History of Economic Thought" by E.K. Hunt
    Chapters: Chap. 16
  8. "Understanding Capitalism" by Bowles and Edwards
  9. "The Profit System" by Green and Sutcliffe
    Chapters: Chap. 1
  10. "Economics" by Hunt and Sherman
    Chapters: Chap. 18
  11. "Foundations of Economics" by Yanis Varoufakis
  12. "Introduction to Post-Keynesian Economics" by Marc Lavoie
    Chapters: Chap. 1
  13. "Debt: The First 5000 Years" by Graeber
    Chapters: Chap. 2
  14. "Understanding Modern Money" by Randall Wray
  15. "Macroeconomics" by Sherman and Evans
    Chapters: Chap. 17
  16. "Theory of Economic Dynamics" by Michel Kalecki
  17. "Political Economy" by Peter Reynolds
  18. "The Capitalist System" by Edwards, Reich and Weisskopf
    Chapters: Chap. 3
  19. "The Reconstruction of Economics" by Gruchy
    Chapters: Chap. 1
  20. "Economics, A User’s Guide" by Ha-Joon Chang
    Chapters: Chap. 5
  21. "Social Structures of Accumulation. Long Swings and Stages of Capitalism Gordon, Edwards and Reich" by Kotz, McDonough, Reich
  22. "A Guide to What’s Wrong with Economics" by Edward Fullbrook
    Chapters: Chap. 22
The above information outlines module EC219: "Comparative Economic Thought" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EC207: Irish Economic History


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

Economic history has experienced a revival of interest in recent times, as the global crisis/recession has prompted policy-­‐makers, academics, and citizens, to seek lessons from the past, and to attribute some of the origins of the crisis itself to the ‘forgetting’ of economic history. Ireland’s current economic problems have also prompted reflections on the need to understand our historical experiences. Economic history—and Ireland’s especially—irrespective of its contemporary relevance, can fascinate in its own terms. The study of economic history can ‘round out’ a standard economics education with context, an awareness of the fragility of evidence, and a sense of perspective. There has never been a better time to study economic history. This module introduces you to key themes, concepts, and debates in Irish economic history, from the 18th century to date. The module explores quantitative historical economic data for Ireland, relating data to economic theory. So while the module is not technical, neither is it purely descriptive/narrative. The module complements other intermediate modules in economics, drawing upon both microeconomic and macroeconomic concepts. Lectures introduce you to key concepts, events, and data in Irish economic history. Lectures also invite you explore the required readings in depth. That in-­‐depth reading is vital for success in this module. While I will sketch some of broad outline of Irish political history in earlier topics, if this is new to you, you will need to read general short histories of Ireland, and I can provide some guidance on this in class.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. understand key themes, concepts and debates in Irish economic history from the 18th century to-date
  2. explore quantitative historical economic data for Ireland, relating data to economic theory
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (70%)
  • Continuous Assessment (30%)
Teachers
The above information outlines module EC207: "Irish Economic History" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EC382: International Economics


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

Trade theory is the oldest branch of economics. The positive and normative aspects of trade engaged Mercantilist, Classical and currently Neo-Classical writers on economics. A central concept that was successfully adopted from Classical theory and adapted with Neo-Classical tools is Comparative Advantage (CA), the idea that all countries, regardless of their level of technological development, can unambiguously gain from trade. Paul Samuelson when asked by a hostile journalist to name an idea in economics that was not just common sense dressed up in fancy language replied "The theory of Comparative Advantage; not only is it uncommon sense, it is even counter-intuitive, yet it captures a profound and significant insight." A significant portion of this course will examine the concept of CA. A survey conducted among academic economists in the US in 1996 revealed that 97% of them believed that all countries can gain from free trade. In addition to examining the standard literature, this course will also look at the arguments of the dissenting voices and the basis for their disquiet with the orthodoxy. Subsequent developments within the neo-classical canon, such as market distortions and their implication for trade theory will also be analysed. In addition to the textbook students will be encouraged to read and critique the original articles of some of the most influential thinkers in the history of trade theory.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Explore the theoretical foundations of International Trade
  2. Understand elements of trade
  3. Discuss what governments can do to influence trade flows
  4. Discuss how government policy can be used as a strategic tool by a country to achieve its own international objectives
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (80%)
  • Continuous Assessment (20%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "International Economics: Theory and Policy" by Paul Krugman and Maurice Obstfeld, Melitz, Marc
    Publisher: Pearson/Addison-Wesley
The above information outlines module EC382: "International Economics" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EC386: Public Economics


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This is a final year undergraduate course in public economics. The course examines the role of government in the economy using economic analysis. It covers the topics of efficiency and equity, market failure, cost benefit analysis and public choice. By the end of this course you should have a solid understanding of some of the most important concepts and theories in public economics.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Outline the rationales for government intervention in the economy
  2. Outline and explain the efficiency and equity of resource allocations with and without government intervention
  3. Explain the basic Pareto model of efficient resource allocation and the way that it underpins economic thinking in formulating and evaluating public policy
  4. Illustrate and explain how market failure and government failure results in inefficient resource allocations
  5. Outline and explain the role that government and markets can play in implementing appropriate policy solutions
  6. Outline the role cost benefit analysis and evaluation plays in policy decision making by governments
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (75%)
  • Continuous Assessment (25%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Economics of the Public Sector" by Connolly, S.and A. Munro
    Publisher: Prentice Hall
  2. "Pubic Finance and Public Policy" by Gruber, J.
    Publisher: Worth Publishers
  3. "Intermediate Public Economics" by Hindricks, J. and G. Myles
    Publisher: MIT Press
  4. "Economics of the Public Sector" by Stiglitz, J.
    Publisher: Norton
  5. "Public Sector Economics: Theory, Policy and Practice" by Bailey, S.
    Publisher: Macmillan
  6. "Public Choice" by Meuller, D.C.
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
The above information outlines module EC386: "Public Economics" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EC388: Environmental And Natural Resource Economics


Semester 1 | Credits: 5

This course introduces students to the use of economic tools in analysing natural resource issues. The course discusses issues surrounding environmental sustainability in the context of economic growth. The theory of externalities and public goods are discussed and this addresses environmental external effects with respect to depletion and pollution. Causes of environmental externalities are also included in the context of missing markets and property rights. The components of value which, make up total economic value of environmental goods is considered. These include direct, indirect, option value and existence value. Willingness to pay and willingness to accept approaches are discussed. Revealed and stated preferences valuation techniques are included. Consideration is also given to the analysis of environmental policy instruments, with an emphasis on pollution control. Issues surrounding international environmental problems including climate change are also discussed.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of weak and strong sustainability conditions
  2. Explain the relevance of the first and second law of thermodynamics for economic sustainability;
  3. Explain the theory of externalities, Coase Theorem, missing markets, public goods and Nash-Cournot equilibria
  4. Critically evaluate the optimal extraction of renewable and non-renewable resources
  5. Critically evaluate revealed preference and stated preference valuation methods
  6. Critically assess pollution control instruments including standards, emission permits and Pigouvian taxes and evaluate how these instruments work in practice
  7. Convey an understanding of key international environmental problems including climate change, biodiversity loss, trade in wildlife products and acid rain
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (70%)
  • Continuous Assessment (30%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Natural resource and environmental economics" by Perman, R., Ma, Y., Common, M., Maddison, D and McGilvary, J.
    Publisher: Pearson
  2. "Environmental and natural resource economics" by Tietenberg, T. and Lewis, L.
    Publisher: Pearson
  3. "Environmental economics:theory, application, and policy" by Chapman, D.
  4. "The economics of natural resource use" by Hartwick. J. M. and Olewiler, N.D.
    Publisher: Harper and Row
  5. "Economics of natural resources and the environment" by Pearce, D. & Turner, R.K.
    Publisher: Harvester Wheatsheaf
  6. "Global biodiversity assessment" by UNEP
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
    Chapters: 11 & 12
The above information outlines module EC388: "Environmental And Natural Resource Economics" and is valid from 2016 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EC362: Economics Of Financial Markets


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

A large emphasis is put on making this module quite practical. Alot of what is covered will depend on what is topical in 2016/7. Therefore, we are likely to address such current issues as: - Will 2017 see the top of the current bull run in stock markets? - Which psychological insights are most applicable to investment analysis? - How will central banks (ECB, US Fed) affect global financial markets? - What will the dominant investment strategies of 2017 likely be? - Can you use technology or social media (e.g. Twitter) to analyse equities and financial news? - Can investors use financial derivatives to make profit in volatile markets?
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Analyse key financial assets including equities, bonds, and financial derivatives
  2. Evaluate current trends and financial news events for a range of international financial markets.
  3. Explain the behavioural biases that affect many investment decisions.
  4. Perform equity analysis based on a company’s financial statements and economic environment.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (60%)
  • Continuous Assessment (40%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Essentials of Investments" by Bodie, Kane and Marcus
The above information outlines module EC362: "Economics Of Financial Markets" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EC429: Marine Economics


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This module will use economic analysis to evaluate specific marine policies in the areas of marine tourism and recreation, shipping, offshore energy production, aquaculture, fishing, coastal development, and the protection of marine habitats and biodiversity. The valuation of marine ecosystem services and the bio-economic modelling of the lifecycle of marine species will also be a focus of this module.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the relevance of economic concepts and models to marine resource issues and policies.
  2. Rigorously evaluate the economic impacts of marine management policies
  3. Explain the linkages between economics and environmental science in the marine sector
  4. Communicate with stakeholders working in the ocean economy
  5. Assess the potential of the residents and political and community leaders in coastal areas to design, implement, and sustain policies that balance growth, development, and resource conservation in vulnerable coastal zones
  6. Estimate non-market values for ocean and coastal resources.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (100%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Economic Drivers of Change and their Oceanic-Coastal Ecological Impacts." by Patterson, M. and Hardy, D.
  2. "In Ecological Economics of the Oceans and Coasts" by Patterson, M. and B. Glasvovic
  3. "Environmental and Natural Resource Economics" by Tietenberg, T.
    Chapters: 4 & 5
  4. "Natural Resource and Environmental Economics" by Perman et al.
    Chapters: 4
  5. "Economic Management of Marine Resources" by Whitmarch, D.
    Chapters: Chapter 2
  6. "Fisheries Economics and Management" by Flaaten, O.
    Chapters: Chapters 2, 3
  7. "Pricing Nature: Cost-Benefit Analysis and Environmental Policy" by Hanley, N. and Barbier, B.
    Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishers
  8. "Tidal energy update" by O'Rourke, F., Boyle, F., Reynolds, A.
The above information outlines module EC429: "Marine Economics" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Optional EC3100: Economics and Philosophy


Semester 2 | Credits: 5

This module will explore the interface between economic analysis and moral philosophy. It will show how insights and analytical tools from economics can contribute to ethics, and demonstrate how an understanding of moral philosophy can improve economic analysis. Topics covered include: rationality and the preference axioms, welfare, efficiency and consequentialism, rights, theories of distributive justice, social choice theory, game theory and decision theory.
(Language of instruction: English)

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the relevance of economic models and analysis to questions in ethics.
  2. Appreciate how moral philosophy can improve economic analysis.
  3. Critically assess the rationality assumption of economics, and understand the basic axioms of preference
  4. Understand the approach economists take to measure well-being and to critically appraise it.
  5. Assess the role utilitarianism, consequentialism and Pareto efficiency play in economic analysis.
  6. Critically evaluate different theories of distributive justice.
  7. Understand the role formal techniques from social choice theory and game theory can play in ethics
  8. Understand basic decision theory and questions around the philosophy and mathematics of probability.
Assessments
  • Written Assessment (80%)
  • Continuous Assessment (20%)
Teachers
Reading List
  1. "Economic Analysis, Moral Philosophy and Public Policy" by D.M. Hausman, M.S. McPherson
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  2. "Theories of Distributive Justice" by J. Roemer
    Publisher: Harvard University Press
  3. "Introduction to Decision Theory" by M. Peterson
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press
The above information outlines module EC3100: "Economics and Philosophy" and is valid from 2015 onwards.
Note: Module offerings and details may be subject to change.

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

Successful graduates, who typically go on to take a Master’s in Economics degree, build a variety of careers in private and public sectors, ranging from analyst work in financial services and health sectors, to public sector and consulting roles in economic analysis.

Graduates have found employment in Such companies as Sustainable Energy Ireland; KPMG, AIB and PayPal and in government departments and agencies.

Did you Know?

 A combined fee arrangement applies to those who complete this programme and subsequently are admitted to one of the three masters in economics at NUI Galway (i.e., international finances, health economics, and natural resources economics and policy). In these cases, the higher diploma is treated as the first year of a two-year programme, with the second, (masters) year involving a lower fee (in 2018/19, this is expected to be €3,000 for EU students). Contact the programme director for details.

Who’s Suited to This Course

Learning Outcomes

 

Work Placement

Study Abroad

Related Student Organisations

Course Fees

Fees: EU

€5,965 p.a. 2017/18

Fees: Tuition

€5,741 p.a. 2017/18

Fees: Student levy

€224 p.a. 2017/18

Fees: Non EU

€13,250 p.a. 2017/18

Postgraduate students in receipt of a SUSI grant – please note an F4 grant is where SUSI will pay €2,000 towards your tuition.  You will be liable for the remainder of the total fee.  An F5 grant is where SUSI will pay TUITION up to a maximum of €6,270.  SUSI will not cover the student levy of €224.

Postgraduate fee breakdown = tuition (EU or NON EU) + student levy as outlined above.

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